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Why Early Intervention Programs Benefit Kids with Developmental Delays

1

Improves The Child’s Prognosis

Early Intervention improves and enhances the development of a child with developmental delays, special needs, or other concerns.

2

Better Understanding

Early Intervention provides better understanding for families with a child who has developmental delays, special needs or other concerns and in turn  empowers families to find better ways do deal with difficult situations. 

3

Lays a Foundation

Early Intervention lays a foundation that will improve the life of the child and offer greater opportunities.

 

The Most Crucial Years

Research shows that learning and development are at their highest in the preschool years. Some children, due to Nero developmental delays which occur in the early years, risk missing some of the most important learning and developmental milestones.  Early intervention drastically improves their developmental prognosis during the early years.

It  is also very important that families with a child with special needs have a reliable support system. Families often experience frustration, stress, disappointment, and helplessness. This can be very debilitating for the family and further affect the development of a special needs child.  Early intervention can help the family to build a nurturing and supportive environment for the entire family.

Early intervention can change a child’s prognosis drastically, especially their teenage years and into adulthood.  Studies has shown that early intervention programs has far more benefits than just the immediate future during a child’s development years.  They have a significantly impact on the child’s ability to integrate in social environments such as school, community, and ultimately employment.

 

The following book is a must have for every family living with Autism

 

An Early Start for Your Child with Autism

 

Using Everyday Activities to Help Kids Connect, Communicate, and Learn

Proven methods based on the breakthrough Early Start Denver Model

Authors:

Sally J. Rogers, PhD

Geraldine Dawson, PhD

Laurie A. Vismara, Phd